Statistical Analysis to Determine the Impact of Various Factors on Student Self-Efficacy

September 22, 2023
James Ingram
James Ingram
🇺🇸 United States
Statistical Analysis
James Ingram is a seasoned statistician with 10+ years of expertise, specializing in statistical analysis. Holding a master's degree in statistics from Saint Leo University, he assists students in completing assignments with precision and excellence.
Key Topics
  • Problem Description:
  • Solution
    • Null Hypotheses:
    • Research Design:
  • Significance for Social Change:
  • Conclusion:

Our statistical research investigates the impact of various variables, including gender, socio-economic composite scores, parents' educational levels, school control, and students' perceptions of science teacher standards. By examining these elements, we seek to uncover the intricate web of influences that can either bolster or hinder students' belief in their own capabilities in the world of science. Join us in exploring the intricate interplay of these factors, revealing the keys to empowering students on their scientific journey.

Problem Description:

In this Statistical Analysis assignment, we aimed to investigate the influence of multiple factors on students' self-efficacy in science. Specifically, we explored how gender, socio-economic composite scores, parents' educational levels, school control, and the perception of science teachers setting high standards for teaching affect students' self-efficacy in science. The dependent variable in our research was students' self-efficacy in science, which was assessed using a continuous scale of student science efficiency. Meanwhile, the independent variables included gender, socio-economic composite scores, parents' educational levels, school control, and students' perceptions of high teaching standards in science.

Solution

Null Hypotheses:

  1. H01:The average scale of student science efficiency does not significantly differ across the levels of gender, socio-economic composite scores, parents' educational level, school control, and the perception of science teachers setting high standards for teaching.
  2. H02:The average scale of student science efficiency does not significantly differ across any of the possible two-way interactions.
  3. H03: The average scale of student science efficiency does not significantly differ across any of the possible three-way interactions.
  4. H04:The average scale of student science efficiency does not significantly differ across any of the possible four-way interactions.
  5. H05: The average scale of student science efficiency does not significantly differ across the five-way interaction.

Research Design:

We selected a cross-sectional research design as it is most suitable for this study, focusing on examining existing differences between groups. Respondents were assigned to groups based on these pre-existing differences.

Key Findings:

  • Descriptive statistics revealed that, for males whose parents had less than a high school education, and if the school control was public, students who strongly agreed that most people can learn to excel in science exhibited a significantly higher mean science self-efficacy (M=1.42) compared to those who agreed (M=-0.03) or disagreed (M=-0.33).
  • Significant effects were observed for gender and the belief that most people can learn to excel in science, while no significant differences were found for parents' education, parent employment, or school control.
  • Significant two-way interactions were identified between gender and school control, parent education and parent employment, school control and parent employment, and school control and the belief that most people can learn to excel in science.
  • A significant three-way interaction was found between gender, parent education, and school control.
  • A significant four-way interaction was identified between gender, parent education, parent employment, and the belief that most people can learn to be good at science.
  • The five-way interaction was not significant.
  • The overall model was significant (η^2=0.16), indicating a large effect.
  • Pairwise comparisons revealed that males had significantly higher science self-efficacy than females.
  • A significant difference in science self-efficacy was observed for students whose parents had Ph.D./M.D./Law/other high-level professional degrees compared to those with less than a high school education.
  • Students who strongly agreed that most people can learn to excel in science exhibited significantly higher science self-efficacy compared to those who agreed, disagreed, or strongly disagreed.

Significance for Social Change:

The significance of this research lies in its implications for social change. By identifying student variables as the primary factors affecting science self-efficacy, we provide valuable insights to policymakers. This knowledge can inform targeted interventions and initiatives to improve self-efficacy in science among students, ultimately contributing to the enhancement of science education and career prospects.

Conclusion:

In summary, our research suggests that gender and the belief in the ability to learn science significantly affect students' self-efficacy in science. Conversely, parents' education, employment, and school control do not have a significant impact. Therefore, it appears that student variables are the primary factors influencing self-efficacy in science. This finding is crucial for policymakers and can guide interventions aimed at promoting self-efficacy in science among students.

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